Patrick De Gabriele

Travel consultant focused on cultural travel in the Middle East & Mediterranean

Italy

Marforio in Rome

Marforio in Rome

Rome

Rome

The art and culture of Italy are so deeply embedded in our western Europeanimagination, and the images the name evokes are so familiar, that the problem for the traveller becomes one of selection – what do we try to see in a relatively short time? I think the answer may be to go back as often as possible!

Milan Cathedral

Milan Cathedral

 

Milan is Italy’sfinancial, business and fashion centre, and the place to see the country at its most cosmopolitan and stylish. It’s home to La Scala opera house, the magnificent Gothic cathedral, Leonardo’s Last Supper, wonderful public galleries, and of course the world-famous fashion district.

 

 

Lake Garda

Lake Garda

 

The largest and easternmost of Italy’s lakes is Lake Garda. The relatively open southern shores give way in the north to dramatic cliffs and snow-capped mountains, with tiny towns clinging picturesquely to the hills.

 

 

 

Venice has always enchanted travellers. This improbable place, seeming to float on its lagoon, dominated the Adriatic and the near East for a long time, and turned its massive trading wealth into a treasurey of art and architecture. Little changed for centuries, the city manages to absorb the vast numbers of visitors with serenity, and it’s still possible to escape the crowds by walking a short way from the big tourist sights.

The Grand Canal

The Grand Canal

 

The treasure house of Florence is indelibly associated with the art and architecture of the Renaissance – its artists, poets, philosophers and political thinkers blazed a trail to the modern world, and even now the city remains a great centre of art and education. Historic Florence is surprisingly compact, with the majestic Duomo, the stunning array of buildings around the Piazza della Signoria, the Uffizi Gallery, the Ponte Vecchio and the wonderful River Arno all within walking distance.

 Florence

Florence

The citizens of Rome still seem to regard their home as the centre of the world, and it’s hard to disagree with that. The Eternal City has been the capital of the Roman empire, the political centre of Western Europe, the home of the medieval Papacy and the custodian of much of our European culture and art. Its museums, churches, galleries and public places dazzle the traveller; and the earthy attitude of the locals sits well with the vibrant mix of foreigners, pilgrims, immigrants and tourists. One of the many appealing aspects of Rome is that the historic centre is quite compact and easily explored on foot.

St Peter's from the Tiber

St Peter’s from the Tiber

When in Rome, we don’t overlook the obvious sights – Imperial Rome is evident in the Colosseum, the Pantheon, the splendid Forum and the imperial baths. These places never fail to impress and inspire. The Vatican, with the mother church of Christianity, St Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the wonderful museums, is of course a must. Rome’s churches are a delight, but please note, my obsessive interest in sacred architecture is never inflicted in full on my travellers (unless they want it!)

Heading south, we usually make a stop in Naples, the grand and shabby city that is almost a country in itself. Of all the riches on offer, we always sample the splendid National Archaeological Museum, and a pizza, which tastes better in its place of origin. Naples serves as a base for visiting Pompeii and Herculaneum, the Roman provincial towns that were destroyed by the volcano of Vesuvius and then preserved under its ash. After the grandeur of ancient Rome, the traveller is often struck by the intimacy of these places – we have the streets and houses almost untouched by the disaster, we have casts of ordinary people trapped by the ash as they went about their daily lives, and the effect is one of domesticity rather than pomp.

Palermo markets

Palermo markets

Agrigento

Agrigento

Sicily is culturally quite separate from the rest of Italy, and this has been so for many centuries. The fertile island was fought over and invaded by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Normans, Spaniards and northern Italians, and all left their marks in the art and architecture, as well as the language and cuisine. Ancient Sicily is beautifully represented by Segesta, whose temple and theatre are regarded as among the most magnificently sited monuments in the classical world; Agrigento’s Valley of the Temples; and the wonderful Roman mosaics in the Villa del Casale at Piazza Armerina, to mention only the best known places.

Monreale Cathedral

Monreale Cathedral

The capital city of Palermo prospered under the Romans, and later under the Arabs and the Normans, who built the Norman Palace and the extraordinary Palatine Chapel. A few kilometres from Palermo is undoubtedly Sicily’s greatest treasure, the cathedral of Monreale with its magical blend of Byzantine and Norman art most evident in the splendid mosaics. In a more worldly mode, we always find time in Palermo to visit one of the colorful outdoor markets, and naturally to eat well.

Medieval Cefalu on the north coast, the resort town of Taormina, the cluster of Baroque cities in the south-east, the tiny medieval town of Erice that seems to peer across to North Africa, the glorious city of Syracuse – all are rewarding destinations on this enchanted island.

Syracuse

Syracuse